littlefoible:

573 - kat’s cats

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.

His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.

He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.

He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.

Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.

It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

(via jescissa)

chelseaa-alexiss:

Tried something new today

fiorentfernisia:

Book2: THE CREATIVE LICENSE (Danny Gregory– 2006)

 

 

 

 

This is not a book about drawing. This is a philosophy book about achieving happiness through drawing. By slowing down our routine, by putting more attention on ordinary things, and by learning simple things we are interested of, we may see the goodness around us. Only then may we appreciate what we have more and feel content about them.

To begin, this book argues about how all living things are naturally creative, intuitive, and problem-solving oriented in surviving in this world. However, we, humans, tend to be less spontaneous, more restricted, and more shy, judgmental, and insecure about it. As a result, the older we are, the more unconfident we become in creating things, including drawing. This leads to the unexamined life that is not worth living. In the end of the introductory part, this book assures us how this problem can be fixed by start reading and experiencing the content of this book.

The first chapter (Drawing) shows how drawing is nothing so exoteric for those who have talent in it. Drawing is nothing but holding a pen on a paper and dragging it along an angle and length according to the line we are seeing. So as easy and simple as that is, drawing is nothing so extraordinary that anyone can do it. This chapter guides us to perceive proportion, negative space, and contour of objects by perusing them. Once we try and success on this, we may gain confidence to keep doing it again.

The second chapter (Journaling) then introduces the importance of keeping a visual journal. It offers not less than a dozen reasons of why we should do it. It also shows how tenable it is to keep a journal that we can actually spend only minutes between each of our everyday activities to draw. In the end, it argues that our visual journal is a private thing that we may be as free as we can in choosing what to draw and how to draw it. It proves that argument by showing variety of things to draw -such as: maps, typefaces, composition, etc.

Continuing exploring things to draw, chapter three (Shock) shows how shocking, astonishing, and captivating our findings might be through drawing. It introduces us to draw in themes, in many degrees of details, from many angles of perspective. Not only that may we realize overlooked aspects in our everyday life, we may also feel fulfilled in finally knowing and appreciating them.

Chapter four (Sensitizing) invites us to be more present in whatever we do. By being more sensing when we draw, our drawing will contain memory of our story and feeling. We can remember the reason why we draw one object instead of the others, the importance of one detailed part of a thing we draw, and at last what we learn through that drawing process. Not only that, one article in this chapter interestingly compares drawing to showering; it shows how both –if done in a more sensing way – may offer a paradoxical blend of tranquillity and creativity useful in our day. By doing both we can be more intuitive – to suspend our judgement of problems and to set our imagination free as – to associate subconsciously one thing from another in our head. Finally, we may bring those ideas to our next activities.

Chapter five (Resistance) prevents us from stopping the habit. It suggests us to keep a deadline and to keep reassuring ourselves that we will have never learnt the world enough. As a learning process, chapter six (Judgement) argues that we shouldn’t judge our drawing commercially but based on our feeling of fulfilment.

Chapter seven (Identity) and eight (Expanding), related to one another, argue that we shouldn’t limit our identity, but experiment on more types of objects to learn, on more drawing media, with more people, through even other forms of art.

Chapter nine (Next), ends the book by telling the true stories of some people in their search of creativity in their life. It shows how we can do the same and be happier in our life.

 

emilianadarling:

Game of Thrones opening theme - Mashup of Jason Yang (violin) and Roger Lima (rock) covers

Holy FUCK. This is amazing. 

image

(Source: mishaphilia, via roterwolkenvogel)

renjin-chan:

you can tell this is a high ranking bun, because he is wearing a crown that is also a bun

renjin-chan:

you can tell this is a high ranking bun, because he is wearing a crown that is also a bun

(Source: fullmtal, via jescissa)

d0gbl0g:

buttart:

f-ili:

Puppy versus Dandelion

HE’S SO UPSET

what a monster

(via kiyakotari)

kitty-rah:

Some doodly backgrounds!

(Source: chenna-kitty, via roterwolkenvogel)

areeceylife:

twssonline:

jhameia:

sarahjhuynh:

writeswrongs:

Two more kickers: “There’s absolutely no benefit seen when women reach out to female faculty, nor do we see benefits from black students reaching out to black faculty or Hispanic students reaching out to Hispanic faculty,” and, “In business academia, we see a 25 percentage point gap in the response rate to Caucasian males vs. women and minorities.” Word, this sounds great, we’re doing great. [NPR]

But white male privilege doesn’t exist?

And then there’s this:

Milkman found there were very large disparities between academic departments and between schools. Faculty at private schools were significantly more likely to discriminate against women and minorities than faculty at public schools. And faculty in fields that were very lucrative were also more likely to discriminate. So there was very little discrimination in the humanities. There was more discrimination among faculty at the natural sciences. And there was a lot of discrimination among the faculty at business schools.

Uh-huh tell me again how science and money are ideologically neutral.

Wowza.

Science is ideologically neutral.

 That doesn’t mean that scientists can’t be shits.

Reblogging for that last comment.